Archive for February, 2014

153 Title bike

The momentum has not slowed and the finish is in sight. Reassembly of the CB160 continues to go strong and steady. It has taken me many years to learn how much time I need to budget for project completion. In the case of the 65Revive project I had already planned out a reassembly timeline back in September. I am please to say that I am on track and may even be slightly ahead of schedule. I am looking forward to the riding season and want to ensure that the bike is 100% complete before the spring melt off.

I last left off with a rolling chassis and an engine bolted in. Since that time I have been able to reach approximately 98% completion. I have already started fearing potential empty nest syndrome. Like previously posts I’ll take you through the process with pictures.

153 Hardware never ends

The powder coating seems to never end. I am hoping this is the last bit of hardware I need to coat, here the the final parts have been blasted. My objective was to NOT use one spec of spray bomb on the bike, I am pleased to announce I have succeeded.

153 More baking

Last bit of baking, this round ran me out of hanging wire.

153 Lic bracket

As much as no one wants to run a license plate it is required. I set up some 6061 aluminum on the mill and machined out a nice simple holder. Once complete it was powder coated matte black to blend it in.

153 Seat fitment

The lines of the bike are very crucial therefore fit and finish are a priority. I spent awhile building adjustments into the seat in order to allow it to sit perfectly with the rear frame hoop.

153 Hiding wires

One of the main build objectives was to hide all the wiring. In the case of the handle bars the wiring all got run inside. Holes were drilled and grommets installed to keep things clean.

153 Rat's nest

The factory wire harness was of no use to me. Almost every electrical component on the bike had been upgraded or moved. The entire wiring harness was built from scratch. I initially drew out a rough plan on paper but in the end I ended up building it as I went along. Many of the connectors were upgraded to weather pack connectors. All splices were soldered and wrapped with heat shrink.

153 Cleaned up

I am a big believer that even components that are not seen need to be clean and have the same attention to detail. The custom wiring harness cleaned up well in the end and everything tucked in beautifully.

153 Packed in

Here you can see everything I packed into under the fuel tank. Horn, coil, and a couple of relays.

153 New chain

I don’t know why I am posting this picture. Look everyone! I put a new chain on! Whooooopppppppeeee!

153 Bike tuning

With most of the bike complete I spent some time tuning the carbs and checking the timing. I set it up near the garage door and ran an exhaust hose out so I wouldn’t choke out on the fumes.

153 Carb sync

Was able to sync the carbs beautifully.

153 Base timing

Base ignition timing came in at 12 degrees, good enough for me.

153 Full advance

Full advance? 42 degrees! Nothing like getting a jump on that power stroke.

Below is video proof the the bike is alive. It starts great and runs. The custom exhaust and muffler sound good.

153 Cover swap

With tuning done and ignition timing confirmed I was able to swap out my timing cover for the NOS Honda stator cover.

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From here on in it is basically a picture show. The bike is complete. There are a few details that need to be addressed but I need to wait until I can ride it before I can evaluate what needs to be done.

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I opted to mount a super clean button in my steering stem that allows me to cycle through my instrument cluster menus.

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Instead of using the factory starter button I chose to mount one next to the ignition switch. I turned the factory starter button, on the throttle housing, into my horn button. I like to think of it as my security system. If someone tries to start the bike they will end up sounding the horn instead of cranking the engine. Ha!

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I spent forever obsessing about the rear brake switch. I wanted something clean. I finally came up with the idea of using the rear brake lever stop as the switch. I Machined some plastic bushings in order to insulate the stop. Then using a single ground wire and a 5 pin relay I was able to turn the stop into a switch. Worked great and is almost undetectable.

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So the main work is complete and I need to turn my attention to getting this thing insured and registered. It is not that straight forward and I need to jump through hoops almost every step of the way. I have budgeted a month to deal with the paperwork and hope that things will work in my favor.

CB160 right side

152 Title piston

Every once and awhile I will cruise through my blog postings just to take stock of what I have posted in the past and therefore I am able to plan for the future. I am the sole editor of all my posts. I review the post before I publish it, I ensure all the links work, the pictures will blow up to full size, and the grammar and spelling are correct. The reason I am telling you this is because I can’t believe how many spelling mistakes I catch when reviewing my work once it has already been published. So in this posting I am offering up an apology in my obvious downfall as an editor. I will continue to try and improve however I suspect I will always miss a certain number of spelling and grammatical errors. I realize it probably does not bother most of you but it bugs me. There…I said it, let’s move on.

As my blog will show I have spent the majority of my garage time working on my 65revive project. There are still times when I fit in side projects and usually it is something that is functional and not worth posting. The other day I was in need of a thank you gift for a friend who helped me out with a few things so I thought I would build one. I wanted something cool but I wasn’t able to commit a weeks’ worth of time to the project. After some pondering I came up with an idea that allowed the task to be accomplished in an evening yet still have a bit of wow factor. The following pictures will run through the 4 hour build process of what turned out to be a thank you for much appreciated help.

152 BMW piston

Started out with an old BMW piston I had laying around.

152 Initial clean up

I performed an initial clean up on the lathe using 320 grit sandpaper and Scotchbite.

152 Starter hole

Next I moved onto the milling machine to center the piston out and drill a starter hole.

152 Milling slot

Next step was to mill out a slot large enough to hold a stack of business cards. I milled just far enough to allow the pin bosses to act as some internal card support.

152 Trimming base

I needed to build a base in order to seal the bottom off that way if the card holder is picked up the cards won’t fall out the bottom. I rough cut a circle out of .375″ plate 6061 aluminum using the plasma torch.

152 Machined to fit

With the disc rough cut I was able to machine it down to final dimensions on the lathe.I made it to be a press fit into the piston base.

152 Bottom blasted

With all the “construction” completed it was time to move onto the finsihing phase. Here the top of the piston got taped off and the bottom half was glass bead blasted.

152 Top polished

Now the bottom section gets taped and the top half gets a 3 stage polishing.

152 Powder coated

It was time to now fog the bottom with matte black powder coating and slide it into the oven for a 15 minute heat soak at 375 degrees.

152 Completed holder

Finished product. It’s not a work of art but it is functional and kind of cool.