Archive for March, 2015

165-001

I received a notice from my daughter’s school looking for silent auction donations for an upcoming fundraiser. The funds were going towards the school’s parent council and are to be used to fund programs, and purchases, not covered by the schools budget. I thought it would be fun to donate something that was hand machined in hopes that my labor would score a decent bid and therefore increase the funds collected from the auction.

I wanted to fabricate something that would appeal to a wide audience and so I settled upon machining a yo-yo. I figured both kids and adults could enjoy the pleasures that come from rotational energy. The yo-yos I build are not pro style trick units, they do not run ball bearing axles or friction pads. The units I make are for the pure novice that can appreciate the joys that come from classic design.

The first order of business was to change the name. Although yo-yo is a generic, non-trademarked, name I felt it was too immature. Therefore instead of machining a yo-yo I opted to machine a Vacillating Vertical Pendulum. The concept is the same, only the name has changed.

Since the pendulum will be placed on an auction block I opted to machine a custom storage case for it as well. I have posted pictures of my “yo-yos” in the past but have not dedicated an entire post outlining the process. The following is jam packed with pictures showing the procedure I have developed to make a Vacillating Vertical Pendulum.

165-010

The entire process starts off with a section of 6061 aluminium. Normally I use 2.250″ stock however I was out so I was forced to start with a 2.500″.

165-020

Since there are a total of 18 holes being drilled in each half I try and keep the starting thickness down to a minimum. The final thickness of each half will be .500″. Working with a .550″ thick section allows .050″ for rough, and finished, machining.

165-030

First machining step involves facing the one side and then drilling, and tapping, a 6 mm hole .300″ deep. Look at me splitting metric and imperial.

165-040

To make the rest of the machining easier, and to avoid damaging the finish, I use an arbor I made that has a 6 mm stud.

165-050

Using the arbor I face the opposite side. No need to clean up the diameter yet.

165-060

With the 2 blanks built it is time to move onto the milling machine and set it up for the drilling of the lightening holes.

165-070

The milling machine gets dialed into the center of the blank.

165-080

Next I use the DRO (Digital Read Out) to program in the placement of all the holes.

165-090

All the holes get marked using a centering drill.

165-100

The twelve outer holes get final drilled using a .250″ drill bit. The inner 6 holes are opened up to .3125″.

165-110

The blanks start off at 110 grams (there is that metric again)

165-120

The 18 holes shave off 22 grams of weight.

165-130

Next it is back onto the lathe to clean up the inside face of the blanks.

165-140

These are the blanks prepped and ready to get the final weight machined off.

165-150

Here the diameter gets spun down to a final dimension of 2.200″.

165-160

As previously mentioned I would typically start with 2.250″ stock however in this case you can see the amount I had to take off from the 2.500″ I actually started with.

165-170

Using the arbor in the lathe chuck I face off enough material to bring the thickness down to a final .500″.

165-180

In my quest to shave off more weight I set up to trim the outer face at a 14 degree angle.

165-190

With the face trimmed up I chamfer the corners using a 30 degree angle.

165-210

With the final machining complete I clean up the edges using 320 grit sandpaper. The 30 degree chamfer, performed in the previous step, allows for a sanding of a smooth corner.

165-200

Here you can see the rough clean up on the left as opposed to the final machining on the right.

165-220

Total weight has now come down to 41 grams.

165-230

With all the machining completed it is now time to move onto the second phase of the process. Since the units are going to be anodized it is crucial that the surface finish is perfect before zapping them in an acidic bath. To make polishing easier I decided to build an arbor to help keep the machined faces from “getting away”.

165-240

2 stage polishing is adequate for the anodizing process.

165-250

The foreground face has been machined where as the background face has only been sanded using 320 grit and Scotchbrite.

165-260

This picture makes it obvious I am building 2 Vacillating Vertical Pendulums.The second one is for a friend. The polished faces have now gone through a rigorous cleaning process. Aluminum filler rod has been wedged into the 6 mm holes and they are ready to get dunked in the ano bath.

165-270

Here they all sit in a bath of sulphuric acid for 2 hours with approximately 2 amps of current flowing though the liquid.

165-280

The anodizing process is complete after the 120 minutes, it is evident that the process worked by the change in color to a light grey.

165-290

The unit that is being donated for the silent auction is being dyed a red bordeaux finished. Total time spent in the color bath is approximately 10 minutes. After that the units get boiled in water for 30 minutes to seal the color in.

165-310

This picture is kind of just stuck in the middle of everything. The axle shaft is cut from a 6 mm stainless steel threaded rod. Here the bushing , that the axle slides through, is being cut from a section of .3125″ aluminum.

165-303

These are the 2 dyed, and sealed, pendulums. Pretty!

 

165-306

I like to add a silver lining around each hole using a chamfer bit on a hand drill.

 

165-320

Since the Vacillating Vertical Pendulum requires a place to be stored I thought that a custom case would be in order. Here I started by machining down a section of 1.000″ 6062 aluminum to act as a storage perch.

165-330

A radius sliced into the top will allow for some stability when resting the pendulum on its stringed axis.

165-340

The base of the storage case was, once again, trimmed out from aluminum. A threaded 10 mm center hole will allow the center perch to attached.

165-350

The base of the storage case received a coat of matte black powder and then got baked at 375 degrees for 15 minutes.

165-360

Time to clean and assemble everything. The pendulums received a hand waxing with some Collinite’s #850.

165-370

Here are all the components, before assembly, that make up the entire project. The glass cover was purchased and the base was machined to fit.

165-380

The center storage perched was screwed into the base. Note the humidity control holes that was drilled into the base to allow for strict climate control inside the case.

165-390

The storage case received a GG decal to finish things off.

165-400

To ensure that the person who purchases the item knows that it is authentic a certificate, and specification document, was created.

165-410

Advertisements

164-010

I’m a bit overdue for a blog update. January and February have been busy as I find myself in the middle of developing my basement. It’s taken this long to start construction as I had submitted, over the years, multiple requests to the boss of the house to develop part of the bottom floor into a machine shop. Even though I had followed proper request procedures my application had continued to be denied. It was only until now that I chose to accept my failed dream and therefore blue printed the space out to be a bedroom instead. I am trying to find the silver lining surrounding my defeat, I need more time.

As far as the CNC plasma table build goes it is still active but did slow down a bit. Good news is I still have the enthusiasm to see the project to completion. I have all the material sitting on the workbench for the next stage. I hope to be back on it in a month or so.

Around the holiday break in December I had a few hours of spare time so I cleaned up the shop area. Once everything was put away and swept up I looked around to see if I could scratch a creative itch I had. I found a used, but still decent, clutch disc out of a Porsche laying in a pile of junk. I set it on the bench and stared at it for a while. I wanted to build something, didn’t want it to take too long, and wanted a decent satisfaction level to result from my efforts. A Porsche technician had given me the disc and so I thought I would give it back to him but in a different state. Decided I would fab an old school shop clock, the following is what I came up with.

164-020

Started by ring rolling a section of .250″ cold rolled steel

164-030

I band sawed 12 little sections of .500″ cold rolled round bar then cleaned them up on the lathe. Each one received cross drilling on the mill.

164-040

Next they all went back onto the lathe where they where all threaded .250″ deep with a 6mm tap.

164-050

To ensure all my number markings would be spaced properly I created a paper template using a CAD program. The ring, with all the .500″ markings, got locked into place at the proper spacing.

164-060

Next the .500″ markings got TIG welded into place.

164-070

Here is the completed ring. I hid the closing gap of the ring inside one of the steel markers.

164-080

Onto the face of the clock. I trimmed out a 13″ disc from a chunk of 10 gauge steel. Machined a center bushing in order to allow for a clock motor to be mounted. Then I ring rolled some 1″ flat bar in order to give the perimeter a more finished look.

164-090

Clock motor bushing was TIG welded into place.

164-100

I wanted to ensure the clock would hang flush against a vertical surface. A section of flat bar was welded into place to allowing for mounting to a wall.

164-110

Here is the finished fabrication work. Next step will be the finishing and artwork.

164-120

Old school Porsche meant going with a red a white theme. The clock components received powder coating.

164-130

Here the clock face receives a 20minute bake session.

164-140

The artwork was going to be applied in the form of a vinyl decal. I downloaded the proper Porsche font and designed the look of the clock face using Inkscape .

164-150

I cut the 1 piece decal out using my vinyl plotter.

164-160

With the decal applied all that was left was component assembly.

164-170

164-180