Archive for the ‘Powder coating’ Category

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A friend of mine that works at the local Porsche dealer has been harassing, yes harassing, me to supply him with a gordsgarage automotive themed item for what seems like an eternity. My friend, who shall remain nameless, came to me with a Porsche PCCB center lock brake rotor that was taken out of service and requested that it be converted into a clock for his man cave. I said I would see what I could do.

As cool as clocks can be they always seem to be the default fab item for anything that is round. Brake rotor clocks have been done, and overdone, time and time again. If I was going to build a clock it needed to have a slightly different style then most. Even at that it is hard to come up with a truly unique way to display seconds that tick by.

The one thing I had going for me is that ceramic brake rotors weigh a 3rd of what cast rotors do. This will allow me to be able to tack on a bit more weight and still allow it to be hung on a wall. I’m not sure I am totally thrilled with the end result but the feedback I received from others appears that the design meets a certain amount of approval. It serves its function and fits into its environment as designed. The following post takes you through the build process of my version of a man cave brake rotor clock.

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The project revolves around a used Center Lock Porsche PCCB rear brake rotor. Because of the center lock design the holes, where the wheel bolts would typically go, are now equipped with red anodized wheel lugs.

Since I wanted to build something more then just a flat hanging rotor attached to a wall I started off by machining some pivots out of 1.75″ solid round 6061 aluminum. First order of business was to drill, and tap, an 8mm hole.

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Onto the milling machine where the center section got hogged out an inch deep and the width of the rotor.

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The beauty of swarf makes up for the waste it becomes.

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Test fitting of the rough machined rotor clamps prove to fit perfectly.

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To secure the clamps to the rotor a couple of 1/4″ set screws were fitted into each clamp.

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To complete the pivot assemblies a couple end caps and center spacers were spun out on the lathe. I opted to keep all the angles, and design, fairly clean and simple with no added cuts or highlights.

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These are the rough machined pivot assemblies that will get clamped onto opposite ends of the rotor.

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Next it was time to move on the steel work and fabricate the actual wall holder. The rotor pivots were going to require a bushing to help provide the support. A couple of spacers were cut, and faced, from some 2″ seamless tubing I had remaining from my metal bender rollers I built.

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Each bushing received a 3/8″ hole drilled only through one side. Keep scrolling, the reason will be revealed.

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The pivot bushings required some support. I wanted to keep things simple and clean without making the unit look messy or chunky. Not to mention I needed to keep the weight of the entire project as low as possible. I opted to bend some 3/8″ cold rolled rod with a radius that would visually match the brake rotor.

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I sketched out the rotor on the bench to aid in the mock up. This way I could ensure that my clearances would work and that my center line would actual be centered.

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Since the rod support required something to actually be attached to I trimmed up a 19 inch section of 3″ x 1/8″ flat bar. I plasma cut the ends to get rid of the corners.

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I was kind of stuck for creative ideas to attach the rod to the wall support plate. Usually I like to get creative with sort of thing. I decided on keeping the brake rotor the main focal point and opted to fabricate some clean and simple support rods from some 7/8″ cold rolled.

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Concept revealed. Mocking up the components before putting the TIG to them.

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Everything was tacked and final welded. Time to move onto to the other parts of the project.

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The clock face was sliced from a sheet of 6061 aluminum using the circle guide for the plasma torch. Ironically this is the same sheet of aluminum that I cut my German tank sprocket clock face from years ago.

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To clean up the plasma cut, and to ensure the face was perfectly round, the aluminum was mounted on the lathe and trimmed up.

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The PCCB rotor hub has two 8mm holes threaded from factory 180 degrees apart. With a couple of spacers I would be able to mount the face to these existing holes. I programmed in the proper spacing on the DRO for the mill and drilled the face for mounting.

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Here the entire project was mocked up to ensure everything would fit. It does.

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Onto the art work for the clock face. I decided to build a tachometer themed time keeper. Using a combination of Draftsight, InkScape, and vinyl plotter software I came up with this.

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I vinyl plotted the entire face on black vinyl first to ensure it would work the way I wanted it too. I then printed just the “redline” section on red vinyl.

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It’s always so satisfying when I start to peel back the transfer tape to reveal the vinyl. I wasn’t sure what color background to use. I thought of powder coding the face white but in the end I opted to stick with a brushed finish. I think I made the right choice.

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Here is the completed clock. I use continuous sweep movements for my clock motors which not only gets rid of the “ticking” but also gives a more precision look to the second hand.

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Time to move onto the hub side of the rotor. Since this clock is going in a “man cave” I thought I would personalize it for Mike. Started by slicing out a 7 inch diameter section of mild steel to be used as a mounting for more vinyl decaling.

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Porsche uses a 5 x 130 wheel bolt pattern. Using the mills DRO I marked all the mounting holes and then finished them off on the drill press.

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Building using math is so satisfying as things always fit together perfectly.

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The time has come where all the fabrication work is complete and it’s time to move onto the finishing stage. I removed the hub from the rotor and chucked it up in the lathe in order to clean the finish up using Scotchbrite.

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Tractor Red powder is incredibly close to the same shade as factory Porsche red brake calipers. Since I know Mike likes red I figured using the color was a “no brainer”

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The rotor mount was wired to one of my oven’s baking racks and then fogged with the powder.

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With the pivot mounts sealed using silicone plugs it was time to bake the powder coating at 375 degrees for 15 minutes.

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Here are all the components that make up the project before the assembly phase begins. Everything was either powder coated, polished, or brush finished.

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The hub side face received a personalized Mike’s Place decal so that you knew exactly where you are.

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The contrast between the red and the brushed finishes looks good. I was happy that the pivot still works with the added thickness of the power coating.

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Rotor mounted up and centered just waiting for all the guts to be installed.

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The clock face gets mounted using a couple of 5mm black socket head cap screws. Even though the screws are placed a bit far apart they still help give the clock face that”gauge” look. In order for the clock battery to be replaced the face will need to be unbolted from the hub.

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Since the rotor was mounted on a pivot it was important that all visible angles would look good. I like all the nice, clean, lines of the cross section.

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The rotor lugs were originally anodized red from the factory. Since the finish on them was slightly worn, plus the shade of red would clash, I decided to strip them of the anodizing and give them a brushed finish instead.

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I try and add a “GG” somewhere to my projects. This time I applied a decal on the inside where the only time anyone will see it is when the clock motor battery needs to be changed. In this picture the mounting spacers for the clock face are evident.

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I had an idea in my head for some time now but it lacked specifics. Usually I want to have some clear direction before moving into the shop for the execution however I have learned that sometimes good things can result from little planning. Since I didn’t have too much loose, if my idea went sideways, I thought I would just wing it and see what would come of it.

Often I wonder why things are made simple when they work just as well complicated and in the case of my next project I wanted to add an element of engineering to a rather basic item. I needed a shop clip board and wanted to build something that would reflect the environment it would be used in. I love seeing the internal mechanicals of machines and often wonder why people feel they need to cover them up.

In the case of my clipboard I wanted to build a more mechanical type spring mechanism as well as fabricate a more interesting shape for holding the paper. Unfortunately this post is not filled with fabricating pictures. Since I didn’t have a plan I didn’t know when to take pictures. In fact I wasn’t planning to post this project on the blog however it actually turned out ok so I thought I would share. The following pictures show the tail end of the project but it will give you an idea on how it was built.

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The entire clip board was built from 6061 aluminum. I machined everything you see in this picture except for the stainless steel fasteners, spring, and cable. The actual “board” was plasma cut from a sheet of aluminum. I realize it is hard to visualize how this all fits together, just keep scrolling.

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This is the board in mocked up stage to ensure that the spring tension would work. I’m not in love with the lever I built located on the right side of the pivot shaft however I’m going to go with it for now.

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So here I jump straight to the finishing stage. Everthing was either polished or powder coated. Ready for final assembly.

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Finished product! Looks kinda cool, a little bit chunky but still works for me. Next time around I’ll build more intricate.

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The exposed spring mechanism allows viewing of all the action.

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Rocker arm style paper clamps.

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Cable adjustment cap allows for spring tension calibration.

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The paper release lever lacks a bit of an interesting visual but still works, for now.

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Decided to decorate the back side with a unique GG decal. Cut out an old skool diving helmet on the vinyl plotter for no other reason other then it looked cool.

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In the past I have done work for some local automotive dealerships in the area, one of them being the Porsche dealer. This time they had an in house project that they wanted some help with. The annual new car show is coming up and the Porsche dealer wanted a mildly modified vehicle to be able to put on display.

The vehicle to be used is a brand new 2015 Porsche Cayman base model. I am not sure of all the modifications that are planned for it however the one that concerns me is the color of the brake calipers. The dealership determined that they wanted the Cayman to be outfitted with a set of calipers to match the Porsche E-Hybrid line up of vehicles. The Panamera E-Hybrid and 918 Spyder come specially equipped with bright acid green brake calipers.

Normally I would shy away from work like this due to the fact that I am not a professional and that things could potentially go wrong. I explained this to the management of the dealership and made it very clear that “you get what you get and you don’t get upset”. Since the car was an in-stock unit and didn’t actually belong to a customer I felt a bit better to try it out.

Due to the fact that the brakes are somewhat of a safety item it was up to the dealership technician to perform all the mechanical work. The dealership would be responsible for removal, dis-assembly, reassembly, and re-installation of the components. It would be up to the service department to ensure the safety of the vehicle. I was only going to be responsible for the color and that was all.

It sounded like everyone was on board so the plan went ahead. I had always wanted to try my hand at powder coating calipers and here I finally got the chance. As usual you can follow along by scrolling through the pictures below. In the end everything worked out fantastic and the dealership was happy.

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This is the 2015 Porsche Cayman that is going to receive the transformation.

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The base model Cayman is identified by the stock black brake calipers. The S models come with red.

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The calipers were removed from the vehicle and disassembled, by the Porsche technician, before they were passed onto me. Here they are stripped of the pistons, seals, dust boots, bleeder screws, and transfer lines.

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Some people may consider this step a bit excessive but this is how I do things. The caliper piston bores need to be sealed off from glass bead blasting and powder coating. I want to ensure that nothing, unwanted, gets inside the calipers. Instead of masking off the bores I opted to machine aluminum plugs to make the sealing 100% secure as well as provide nice clean, crisp, lines. I had to machine a total of 8 bore plugs.

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This is what the completed plugs look like. There is 1 set for 1 front caliper and 1 set for 1 rear caliper. Best part is that they are reusable.

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This is how the plugs fit into the calipers. They will work for both glass bead blasting and powder coating.

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Since the calipers have been in service I wanted to ensure there were no oils or contaminants on the surface that will destroy the powder coating. I baked the calipers at 500 degrees Fahrenheit for 2 hours to burn everything off. Once done baking the black turns to burnt brown.

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Next step was to plug all the orifices and ship them into the blast cabinet to strip the old coating off and give the surface a bit of a rough texture to allow the powder coating to latch onto.

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You can see how well the aluminum plugs work in protecting the bores.

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Here are all 4 calipers blasted, cleaned, and ready to be prepped for the fogging.

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Using silicone plugs I block off the brake pad securing pegs and bleeder holes. The surfaces that get bolted to the steering knuckle get taped off so that no powder gets applied. Clamping the brake caliper to a steering knuckle with baked plastic in between is not a good idea.

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The person that was in charge of commissioning the work wanted a green powder to coat, something similar to E-hybrid calipers. I ordered, and sprayed, a few samples to allow him to choose what he wanted. In this picture the top and bottom colors are what was ordered, The middle color are the 2 ordered colors mixed 50/50. The Neon Yellow (bottom color) was what was chosen.

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Here the Neon Yellow gets fogged on and ready to get baked at 392 degrees Fahrenheit for 12 minutes PMT.

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Fresh out of the oven, the picture doesn’t do it justice.

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I had explained that I can apply “Porsche” decals to the calipers BUT…they are DECALS! They are not nearly as durable as the factory Porsche crests but it is what I have to offer. They accepted the durability downfall and so using my vinyl plotter, and gloss black vinyl, I cut out factory dimension decals. I had measured placement of the old emblems before I glass bead blasted them.

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All the bleeder screw and brake line holes were cleaned up using and chamfering bit to ensure clean, easy, assembly.

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Once again you can see how well the aluminum plugs worked. They is a slight bit of over-spray on the left bore but not enough powder build up that will impact the dust boot installation.

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Completed calipers with decals applied ready to be returned to the dealership for reassembly and installation.

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Here the Porsche technician is reassembling the freshly coated calipers.

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Front calipers ready to go. No issues sliding the seals and pistons in. The dust boots settled in with no problems.

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Calipers installed and ready to be bled with fresh Super DOT 4 brake fluid.

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The decals look factory! Just don’t put the pressure washer to them.

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Brakes bled, wheels mounted, vehicle roadtested, calipers pass! The Neon Yellow certainly stands out. The dealership is happy with the work, and the color, so I guess it is all good in the end,

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I’m a bit overdue for a blog update. January and February have been busy as I find myself in the middle of developing my basement. It’s taken this long to start construction as I had submitted, over the years, multiple requests to the boss of the house to develop part of the bottom floor into a machine shop. Even though I had followed proper request procedures my application had continued to be denied. It was only until now that I chose to accept my failed dream and therefore blue printed the space out to be a bedroom instead. I am trying to find the silver lining surrounding my defeat, I need more time.

As far as the CNC plasma table build goes it is still active but did slow down a bit. Good news is I still have the enthusiasm to see the project to completion. I have all the material sitting on the workbench for the next stage. I hope to be back on it in a month or so.

Around the holiday break in December I had a few hours of spare time so I cleaned up the shop area. Once everything was put away and swept up I looked around to see if I could scratch a creative itch I had. I found a used, but still decent, clutch disc out of a Porsche laying in a pile of junk. I set it on the bench and stared at it for a while. I wanted to build something, didn’t want it to take too long, and wanted a decent satisfaction level to result from my efforts. A Porsche technician had given me the disc and so I thought I would give it back to him but in a different state. Decided I would fab an old school shop clock, the following is what I came up with.

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Started by ring rolling a section of .250″ cold rolled steel

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I band sawed 12 little sections of .500″ cold rolled round bar then cleaned them up on the lathe. Each one received cross drilling on the mill.

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Next they all went back onto the lathe where they where all threaded .250″ deep with a 6mm tap.

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To ensure all my number markings would be spaced properly I created a paper template using a CAD program. The ring, with all the .500″ markings, got locked into place at the proper spacing.

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Next the .500″ markings got TIG welded into place.

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Here is the completed ring. I hid the closing gap of the ring inside one of the steel markers.

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Onto the face of the clock. I trimmed out a 13″ disc from a chunk of 10 gauge steel. Machined a center bushing in order to allow for a clock motor to be mounted. Then I ring rolled some 1″ flat bar in order to give the perimeter a more finished look.

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Clock motor bushing was TIG welded into place.

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I wanted to ensure the clock would hang flush against a vertical surface. A section of flat bar was welded into place to allowing for mounting to a wall.

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Here is the finished fabrication work. Next step will be the finishing and artwork.

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Old school Porsche meant going with a red a white theme. The clock components received powder coating.

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Here the clock face receives a 20minute bake session.

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The artwork was going to be applied in the form of a vinyl decal. I downloaded the proper Porsche font and designed the look of the clock face using Inkscape .

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I cut the 1 piece decal out using my vinyl plotter.

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With the decal applied all that was left was component assembly.

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Work on the homemade plasma CNC table continues to make progress. After hours of machining I finally have the Z and Y axis all mocked up and in an operating state. I often find that sometimes I need to shift gears slightly just to keep things interesting. Quite often I enjoy sneaking in side projects to break up the action a bit and keep the creative juices flowing. In the case of the plasma CNC build I was at a good stopping point to step away for a couple weeks and doing a few side jobs.

For 5 years now I have been walking into my daughter’s school to pick her up and for 5 years I have been staring at the same “remove your shoes” sign perched at the entry way asking people to do their part in keeping the school clean. The other day when I saw the sign, again, it finally dawned on me that there has to be something better and perhaps it was time for an upgrade.

The schools in my area operate on a tight budget and there is typically no money to be spent on “frivolous” items, especially “remove your shoes” signs. I talked to the principal and asked if I would be able to donate a couple of new signs that would replace the old ones. She was happy to accept the offer.

So this is where one of the side projects come in. I didn’t have a clear game plan and all the ideas I generated started to get to complicated and expensive. The one aspect I did know is that I was going to give my new shop equipment, a vinyl plotter, a workout and use it for all the art work. I decided to just head into the garage, see what metal I had laying around, and start cutting and welding.

I finally settled on a chalkboard/sandwich board retro theme. Everything was going to go black and white to give it a bit of an old school look. Since there are 2 main entrances to the school I offered to double the recipe and build two signs at the same time. As usual the documentation of the project was done in picture format and is available below for your viewing. I am happy with how they turned out and I am even happier that I completed the entire project “in house”.

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This is one of the original signs that I have been staring at for the past 5 years. Although effective, and polite, an upgrade was in order.

 

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Started by building the blank slates. I had some scrap 10 gauge mild steel so I carved out a couple chunks with the plasma torch. Starting size was 14″ x 21″.

 

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90 degrees can be boring so I bent a section of round bar to act as a plasma guide and gave the tops an appealing curve.

 

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To give the sign some depth, and to avoid sharp edges, I added some 1″ flat bar to the perimeter. It all got TIG welded into place on the back side.

 

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I didn’t know what to build for legs so I just started to bend 5/16″ cold rolled steel and eventually came up with this design. I have no pictures to showing the machining of all the mounting pegs. 2 pegs are built to support the sign and the other 2 accommodate the feet. The pegs were cut from 5/8″ cold rolled, drilled and threaded on the lathe and then cross drilled on the mill.

 

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All the support pegs were neatly TIG welded into place. I love TIGing!

 

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These are all the rough sign components that have been fabricated. I will not explain the details since the remaining pictures will clear it all up. Onto the finishing stage.

 

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The dimensions of the sign were determined by 1 thing, the size of my powder coating oven. Before I started the build I measured the oven to see what I could fit in it. It turns out a 21″ tall sign will give me approximately 1/2″ of clearance in the oven. Here I am wiring the sign to my oven rack to get it ready for the powder fogging.

 

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Sign was coated with a matte black powder coat and is now ready to get baked at 375 degrees PMT for 15 minutes.

 

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Matte black sign finished baking and hung for a cool down.

 

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The legs were coated with White Glacier Full Gloss to give them some contrast.

 

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Here the 2 blank canvasses are set to accept the artwork.

 

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Using a combination of Draftsight, Inkscape, and WinPCSIGN software I designed the main artwork. The idea was to go for a chalk board/sandwich board style design.

 

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The decals were cut out on my vinyl plotter using white vinyl. The decals were then prepped and transfer tape was applied.

 

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My daughter had requested happy faces and I didn’t want to disappoint. I sliced a couple out of yellow vinyl, they are approximately 9″ x 9″.

 

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Final product. Decals applied and legs bolted on. Clean, simple, and hopefully, and effective design.

 

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I think the white legs with the white decals was the way to go. I purchased the stainless steel feet and added a rear cross brace between the rear legs to help with stability. An interesting build fact is that I calculated the angle of the sign so that it would be perpendicular with a persons line of vision at a viewing height of 5′ 6″ from 7 feet away.

 

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The happy face satisfied my daughters request. I also figured that because the entire sign was donated I was entitled to give my blog a free plug. If the school doesn’t like it they can peel the decal off.

 

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153 Title bike

The momentum has not slowed and the finish is in sight. Reassembly of the CB160 continues to go strong and steady. It has taken me many years to learn how much time I need to budget for project completion. In the case of the 65Revive project I had already planned out a reassembly timeline back in September. I am please to say that I am on track and may even be slightly ahead of schedule. I am looking forward to the riding season and want to ensure that the bike is 100% complete before the spring melt off.

I last left off with a rolling chassis and an engine bolted in. Since that time I have been able to reach approximately 98% completion. I have already started fearing potential empty nest syndrome. Like previously posts I’ll take you through the process with pictures.

153 Hardware never ends

The powder coating seems to never end. I am hoping this is the last bit of hardware I need to coat, here the the final parts have been blasted. My objective was to NOT use one spec of spray bomb on the bike, I am pleased to announce I have succeeded.

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Last bit of baking, this round ran me out of hanging wire.

153 Lic bracket

As much as no one wants to run a license plate it is required. I set up some 6061 aluminum on the mill and machined out a nice simple holder. Once complete it was powder coated matte black to blend it in.

153 Seat fitment

The lines of the bike are very crucial therefore fit and finish are a priority. I spent awhile building adjustments into the seat in order to allow it to sit perfectly with the rear frame hoop.

153 Hiding wires

One of the main build objectives was to hide all the wiring. In the case of the handle bars the wiring all got run inside. Holes were drilled and grommets installed to keep things clean.

153 Rat's nest

The factory wire harness was of no use to me. Almost every electrical component on the bike had been upgraded or moved. The entire wiring harness was built from scratch. I initially drew out a rough plan on paper but in the end I ended up building it as I went along. Many of the connectors were upgraded to weather pack connectors. All splices were soldered and wrapped with heat shrink.

153 Cleaned up

I am a big believer that even components that are not seen need to be clean and have the same attention to detail. The custom wiring harness cleaned up well in the end and everything tucked in beautifully.

153 Packed in

Here you can see everything I packed into under the fuel tank. Horn, coil, and a couple of relays.

153 New chain

I don’t know why I am posting this picture. Look everyone! I put a new chain on! Whooooopppppppeeee!

153 Bike tuning

With most of the bike complete I spent some time tuning the carbs and checking the timing. I set it up near the garage door and ran an exhaust hose out so I wouldn’t choke out on the fumes.

153 Carb sync

Was able to sync the carbs beautifully.

153 Base timing

Base ignition timing came in at 12 degrees, good enough for me.

153 Full advance

Full advance? 42 degrees! Nothing like getting a jump on that power stroke.

Below is video proof the the bike is alive. It starts great and runs. The custom exhaust and muffler sound good.

153 Cover swap

With tuning done and ignition timing confirmed I was able to swap out my timing cover for the NOS Honda stator cover.

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From here on in it is basically a picture show. The bike is complete. There are a few details that need to be addressed but I need to wait until I can ride it before I can evaluate what needs to be done.

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I opted to mount a super clean button in my steering stem that allows me to cycle through my instrument cluster menus.

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Instead of using the factory starter button I chose to mount one next to the ignition switch. I turned the factory starter button, on the throttle housing, into my horn button. I like to think of it as my security system. If someone tries to start the bike they will end up sounding the horn instead of cranking the engine. Ha!

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I spent forever obsessing about the rear brake switch. I wanted something clean. I finally came up with the idea of using the rear brake lever stop as the switch. I Machined some plastic bushings in order to insulate the stop. Then using a single ground wire and a 5 pin relay I was able to turn the stop into a switch. Worked great and is almost undetectable.

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So the main work is complete and I need to turn my attention to getting this thing insured and registered. It is not that straight forward and I need to jump through hoops almost every step of the way. I have budgeted a month to deal with the paperwork and hope that things will work in my favor.

CB160 right side

152 Title piston

Every once and awhile I will cruise through my blog postings just to take stock of what I have posted in the past and therefore I am able to plan for the future. I am the sole editor of all my posts. I review the post before I publish it, I ensure all the links work, the pictures will blow up to full size, and the grammar and spelling are correct. The reason I am telling you this is because I can’t believe how many spelling mistakes I catch when reviewing my work once it has already been published. So in this posting I am offering up an apology in my obvious downfall as an editor. I will continue to try and improve however I suspect I will always miss a certain number of spelling and grammatical errors. I realize it probably does not bother most of you but it bugs me. There…I said it, let’s move on.

As my blog will show I have spent the majority of my garage time working on my 65revive project. There are still times when I fit in side projects and usually it is something that is functional and not worth posting. The other day I was in need of a thank you gift for a friend who helped me out with a few things so I thought I would build one. I wanted something cool but I wasn’t able to commit a weeks’ worth of time to the project. After some pondering I came up with an idea that allowed the task to be accomplished in an evening yet still have a bit of wow factor. The following pictures will run through the 4 hour build process of what turned out to be a thank you for much appreciated help.

152 BMW piston

Started out with an old BMW piston I had laying around.

152 Initial clean up

I performed an initial clean up on the lathe using 320 grit sandpaper and Scotchbite.

152 Starter hole

Next I moved onto the milling machine to center the piston out and drill a starter hole.

152 Milling slot

Next step was to mill out a slot large enough to hold a stack of business cards. I milled just far enough to allow the pin bosses to act as some internal card support.

152 Trimming base

I needed to build a base in order to seal the bottom off that way if the card holder is picked up the cards won’t fall out the bottom. I rough cut a circle out of .375″ plate 6061 aluminum using the plasma torch.

152 Machined to fit

With the disc rough cut I was able to machine it down to final dimensions on the lathe.I made it to be a press fit into the piston base.

152 Bottom blasted

With all the “construction” completed it was time to move onto the finsihing phase. Here the top of the piston got taped off and the bottom half was glass bead blasted.

152 Top polished

Now the bottom section gets taped and the top half gets a 3 stage polishing.

152 Powder coated

It was time to now fog the bottom with matte black powder coating and slide it into the oven for a 15 minute heat soak at 375 degrees.

152 Completed holder

Finished product. It’s not a work of art but it is functional and kind of cool.