Posts Tagged ‘custom’

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Awhile ago my daughter asked me if I would take her to a certain bath products store so that she would be able to purchase some bath soaps and lotions as a mother’s day gift. This year she showed some initiative in getting something organized for mother’s day so I wasn’t about to deny her some transportation in order for her to execute her plan. When we got to the store I browsed the shelves while my daughter spent all her time smelling every product and deciding what her mom would like the best.

As I enter any retail store I can not help but become obsessed, and fascinated, by the marketing that businesses implement in order to get their products sold. I find it interesting that the cost of a product can drastically increase based on how it is packaged and marketed. It sometimes seems like the substance of the product is irrelevant but if you can make it visually, and emotionally, appealing then people will want it and want to pay for it.

This brings me to my latest garage adventure. I always build things that I find interesting to me. I do not sell my products and certainly do not put any value on them. However I decided that I would take a relatively simple object that I have built in the past and enclose it in some custom packaging to give it a more finished appeal. I would use the marketing technique that we are bombarded by and use it to my advantage.

So this post is not so much about the item as it is the packaging. I won’t go into detail on the specifics since this post is packed full of pictures. There no excuse for you not to know how I did what I did. But I will mention this. I used a new finishing technique that I recently obtained. It is a black oxide finish used for steel. I originally bought the product so that I would have some way to protect the tooling that I sometimes build. More on this later in the post. The second thing I should mention is that this build includes, wait for it……….wood! Yes I know we are all here because we like shiny things. No need to worry or get your end mill in a tizzy, I am not converting. I had an idea and I thought that I would put Mother Nature’s finger print on the project.

The project revolves around building another bottle opener out out of a Porsche 991 GT3 spark plug. I recently obtained 6 of these plugs and therefore I am making a limited edition run of 6 openers, all slightly different. This one is 002/6. Here we go…

 

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So the project started off by cutting off a section of 7/8 cold rolled steel approximately 5 inches long

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Next the chunk got spun down to a .748″ diameter

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Moved onto the milling machine where each side had .130″ shaved off using a 5/8″ end mill.

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Rough milling of the head of the bottle opener

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Time to cut the slot for the business end of the opener. I use a 3/8″ end mill. I eyeball the angle and the depth.

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Chewing out the slot.

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Completed depth achieved. Those bottle caps don’t stand a chance!

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Carved a thumb rest in using a 3/4″ end mill.

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Jumped back onto the lathe where the opener received some cosmetic touches. I cut a couple of .040″ deep grooves spaced apart the same distance as the green lines on a Bosch spark plug.

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Here is the roughed up opener just before its tail will get chopped.

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With the excess material removed the opener head got drilled and threaded with a M12x1.0 tap.

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A little more chamfering and clean up and the machining is complete.

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Done deal, onto finishing stage.

So here we come to the part in the show where I use a black oxide finishing technique. There is a lot that can be said about this however Mr. Google already has it outlined so I will not go into specifics but I will highlight a few things. Black oxide finish is used for a number of reasons. It provides mild corrosion resistance, it gives the steel a certain appearance, and it minimizes light reflection. I started to use the black oxide for its corrosion resistance properties however in the case of this project I am using it strictly for aesthetic purposes, it gives a retro/vintage feel and look to the product.

Black oxide treatment is a chemical process that is typically done hot, around 285 degrees Fahrenheit. However there are other processes that use lower heat as well there are room temperature applications available. In my case I am using a room temperature black oxide kit that I purchased from Caswell Canada. You can visit their site if you want more information. The process is simple. I glass bead blast the part, dip it in the black oxide solution for approximately 30 seconds and then I drop it into a sealer. Because I am using this treatment solely for its appearance I skipped the sealing stage in order to keep the worn and retro black look. I included the following video to show just how quickly the process works.

 

 

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Finished with a black oxide treatment.

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This spark plug has approximately 15 km worth of combusted German petrol, Nitrogen, and Oxygen. Normally I’ll clean the plug however in this case I wanted to keep its authenticity so I opted to leave the sweet smell of carbon connected.

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Completed opener attached to the Porsche 991 GT3 spark plug.

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Onto the packaging. I wanted to try something new and decided to take a chance on machining a wood/metal case for the opener. I started of by machining a couple of aluminum arbors in order to clamp a chunk of mother natures fibers into the metal lathe.

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I am planning on using a hardwood for the case but wanted to ensure my method was going to work before attempting the final product. I chucked up a chunk of 2×4 and spun it down to a cylinder to confirm the success of the plan.

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I purchased a 3/4″ cove bit for a router and chucked it up into my ER32 1/4″ collet on the milling machine. The milling machine doesn’t turn the same number of RPMs a wood router does however the test cut on a scrap 2×4 proved to work

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With my R&D complete it was time to move on and build the case out of good wood. I made my way down to a local wood finishing supplier and dug my way through piles of hardwood. Where I feel perfectly comfortable going to a metal supplier and others don’t I felt awkward shopping for hardwood which I know nothing about. I had to Google FBM (foot, board measure) to figure out how to buy this stuff. Anyway…I found a section of Walnut with a beautiful grain that would work for the project.

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I rough cut the Walnut on my table saw and then moved onto the milling machine to clean all the edges, and dimensions, up. Normally I like to use the proper cutter, speed, and feed, for the proper application. In the case of my wood creation I decided to wing it and use my metal CCMT indexable cutters. Turns out they work great! They are not worthy of a finishing cut but that is what sandpaper is for.

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Once done on the milling machine I was now left with 2 identical sections of Walnut; 1″ thick by 2″ wide and approx. 7.50″ long.

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I needed to join them as one solid block so that I would be able to machine them down. Since the ends would eventually get cut off I used carpenters glue and stuck them together.

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With the 2 halves clamped into a block I needed to find the center. Most people would just “X” the end however I wanted to be as precise as possible. I squared the block up in the mill vise and then used the center finder to locate the middle.

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I dropped a 1/4″ endmill into both ends in order to locate the center line of the block.

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I love it when a plan comes together. Holes are perfectly centered and ready for the arbors.

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If you noticed in the previous picture of the arbors, they were both machined with a centering pin which was intended to drop into the center holes of the Walnut block. This way the arbor was sure to be centered. Both end arbors were then secured using #6 wood screws.

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The Walnut is chucked up in the lathe and ready to get spun down to size using, again, a steel CCMT metal cutter.

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I started of with a 2″ square section of wood which needs to get cut down to a 1.250″ cylinder. I learned fairly quick that the depth of cut can be greatly increase when shaving Walnut.

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Here I am half way through cutting and inspection of the process proves to be working. All 4 corners are cutting evenly indicating that the centering job of the wood on the lathe was fairly accurate.

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Here I have achieved my 1.250″ diameter. a bit of 320 grit sandpaper cleaned the finish up real pretty.

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I’m not going to get into detail here as what I am doing will become evident as you read on. I needed to trim the end diameters down to a small dimension. Using a part off blade worked perfect to complete the task.

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Here the completed rough machining has been accomplished.

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The end of the wood that were glued, and that the arbors were screwed into, have been cut off. The wood was then sanded, along the grain, by hand.

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Next step was to set up on the milling machine and pocket out a section for the bottle opener to sit in using a 3/4″ cove bit.

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As you will see later the case will stay closed using two 1/8″ rare earth magnets. Each wood half received a 1/8″ hole on 1 end to accept the magnet.

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Here are the two completed halves all sanded and ready to accept a finish.

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In order to give the Walnut a protective coating I brushed on a film of clear satin polyurethane. Once dried the finish was smooth sanded using 0000 steel wool.

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With the wood complete it was time to step back into my comfort zone a machine some steel end caps for the case. Here I am starting off with a section of 1.500″ cold rolled steel. It will first get spun down to a 1.250″ diameter.

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With the diameter reached I then hogged out the internals using a boring bar.

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Here are the 2 rough machined end caps.

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Onto the finishing stage. Both caps were glass bead blasted and then treated with the black oxide finish. Obviously the right cap is in its bead blasted state and the left cap has been treated just as the bottle opener head was.

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I wanted to add a personal touch so I opted to incorporate a logo. I cut out an end cap vinyl stencil on the vinyl plotter.

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Next it was centered, and applied, to one end cap. The rest of the cap was taped up to protect the black oxide finished from the bead blasting.

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1 minute in the glass bead blast cabinet and then the decal, and tape, removed revealed a gordsgarage logo. What I like about this technique is that there is no evidence of a depth difference between the black oxide finish and the bead blasting. The logo feels completely flush on the end cap.

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Time to jump back onto the wood section. The 1/8″ rare earth magnets, that I spoke of earlier, got epoxied into the ends of each half. I am hoping it is obvious what theses magnets are for. The idea is that they will keep the case “locked”. The magnets will attract themselves to the opposite half steel end caps. The 1/8″ size turned out to be the correct choice as they do the job of keeping the case closed but aren’t so strong that it makes opening the case feel like it’s sticking.

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The machined end caps also got epoxied onto the opposite ends of the magnets.

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And now there is nothing left to say. Mission accomplished. One 991 GT3 bottle opener with custom case is complete. What is ironic is that the case took 4 times as long to build as the opener.

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I am thrilled with the retro and vintage look of the case. It’s all about the packaging!

 

 

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I had an idea in my head for some time now but it lacked specifics. Usually I want to have some clear direction before moving into the shop for the execution however I have learned that sometimes good things can result from little planning. Since I didn’t have too much loose, if my idea went sideways, I thought I would just wing it and see what would come of it.

Often I wonder why things are made simple when they work just as well complicated and in the case of my next project I wanted to add an element of engineering to a rather basic item. I needed a shop clip board and wanted to build something that would reflect the environment it would be used in. I love seeing the internal mechanicals of machines and often wonder why people feel they need to cover them up.

In the case of my clipboard I wanted to build a more mechanical type spring mechanism as well as fabricate a more interesting shape for holding the paper. Unfortunately this post is not filled with fabricating pictures. Since I didn’t have a plan I didn’t know when to take pictures. In fact I wasn’t planning to post this project on the blog however it actually turned out ok so I thought I would share. The following pictures show the tail end of the project but it will give you an idea on how it was built.

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The entire clip board was built from 6061 aluminum. I machined everything you see in this picture except for the stainless steel fasteners, spring, and cable. The actual “board” was plasma cut from a sheet of aluminum. I realize it is hard to visualize how this all fits together, just keep scrolling.

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This is the board in mocked up stage to ensure that the spring tension would work. I’m not in love with the lever I built located on the right side of the pivot shaft however I’m going to go with it for now.

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So here I jump straight to the finishing stage. Everthing was either polished or powder coated. Ready for final assembly.

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Finished product! Looks kinda cool, a little bit chunky but still works for me. Next time around I’ll build more intricate.

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The exposed spring mechanism allows viewing of all the action.

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Rocker arm style paper clamps.

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Cable adjustment cap allows for spring tension calibration.

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The paper release lever lacks a bit of an interesting visual but still works, for now.

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Decided to decorate the back side with a unique GG decal. Cut out an old skool diving helmet on the vinyl plotter for no other reason other then it looked cool.

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Cycling season is upon us which also means the agony of getting into riding shape has begun. When I ride my road bike I typically ride by myself. I like zoning out and riding at my own pace. What I also like are all the training numbers that can be had, and analyzed, based on my own riding performance. I monitor heart rate and cadence as the primary indicators that help me determine my progress and abilities.

This year I began using the Strava app on my phone which allows me to track more of my riding data. I won’t go into detail about the app since the website would do a better job of explaining it however I will say that it is packed full of data that helps determine the pace I am riding at and how I improve.

Since I want to have my phone visible when I ride I wanted to have it mount in a location on my handlebar stem. There are companies that offer phone mounts for bicycles however the ones that I looked at all had some minor issues that I did not like. I figured I had a Saturday afternoon to kill so I thought I would see what the milling machine could produce for a mount.

I spent a few sleepless hours, the night before, lying awake in bed mentally engineering the mount. Once I had the neuron blueprint made I caught a few hours of sleep then headed into the shop and starting chipping out some 6061 aluminium.

The criteria were fairly basic. The mount needed to be solid; I didn’t want Velcro or rubber bands holding it on. Second concern was that the phone had to mount to it quickly. Third thing was that I wanted the mount to accommodate my Otter Box case. With these 3 personal requests I came up with a plan. The rest is of the story is told below.

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I started off with a section of 1.500″ x .500″ flat 6061 aluminum and began hogging out metal to form a clamp for the phone.

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With the middle sectioned out I started to open things up from the outside.

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A little more milling and I finally had something that resembled the clamp that I dreamt up the night before.

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I required a 6 mm thread in the center hole that would eventually provide the clamping force adjustment.

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I am not a weight junkie however there is no need in carrying around anything that is not required. I milled off some extra aluminum that was not necessary.

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With the clamp roughed out it was time to start on the base. The first order of business included milling out a section to accept the previously build clamp.

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Next step involved hogging out all the unwanted aluminum. My projects sometimes get “chunky” and I did’t want that to happen on this one.

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I needed 2 flanges that would allow me to bolt the holder to the bike and the other to help keep my phone centered. Out came the boring head and things were trimmed up.

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Here it is just rough machined. Not finished yet.

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I test fit the mount on the bike and determined things were, in fact, too “chunky”. I decided that the smaller flange I previously cut in order to keep my phone centered really was not required. Therefore it was time to undo my work. I set the base up on the rotary table and cut off the top section on the mount which included my previously machined smaller flange.

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It is definitely looking better, and lighter, having been cut down.

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As I continue to lighten things up I cut some speed holes. The one exception was the bottom 6 o’clock hole. It was drilled and tapped, you will see why later.

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Here are all the components that make up my holder. You can see a knob, which I didn’t show any pictures of machining it, which will be used in conjunction with my clamp.

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Onto the finishing portion of the project. The mount will get anodized in order to protect if from the elements. Of course I say elements because it needs to sound like I need a reason. Truth is that it just looks really cool when anodized. All the edges and surfaces got touched up and then were hit with 2 stage buffing. Then thoroughly cleaned and ready for anodizing.

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Here they sit in a sulfuric acid bath and soak for a couple hours while getting bombarded with electrons.

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Onto the coolest part of anodizing. 5 minutes in the Red Bordeaux dye resulted in a fantastic shade of red.

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This is the clamp fresh out of the dye.

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Because there is always 1 person that says “How much does that weigh?” the answer is 109 grams. Yes it is weight, get over it!

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Here you can finally see how the mechanics of the clamp works. The knob allows me to tension up the clamp against the soft, flexible, section of the Otter Box phone case.

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The base mounts in place of the steering head center cap. It is solid and secure.

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The single tapped hole in the array of speed holes was done in order to allow me to store the clamp when the phone is not installed. I simply spin the clamp onto the base and that way it won’t get misplaced.

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Here you can see how the entire system was designed, and built, to work. The phone is mounted very securely and has no movement.

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All that is visible from the top side are the fingers that wrap around the sides and clamp. I am happy to say that I have cycled multiple times using the mount and there are no issues.

 

155 Title turbo

With the CB160 project complete I find myself floating between universes with no clear direction. I have more of my own project ideas that I would like to pursue but also find myself in idle mode. There is never a shortage of tasks to complete for others and although I have got better at managing the “request” list I figured I would take on a quick and simple project.

The Porsche dealership in the city was in need of some tool room organization and they required some way to store some large equipment items. The dealership is required to purchase, and needs, certain special tools that are available from the manufacturer. One of these special tools includes multiple large metal engine table lift adapters. Basically they are comprised of metal channel configured to adapt to different models of Porsche engines. The cradles sit upon a hydraulic engine scissor lift table and allows for removal of power train units for various models Porsche produces.

The cradle adapters are big, bulky, heavy, and awkward to store and to move. The have leaned up against a wall for years and all the related adapters just get thrown in a pile. Since the dealership is moving into a brand new facility they didn’t what to transfer the “tool pile” into the new tool room. Some means to organize, store, and move the tooling was required.

155 Cayenne cradle

The cradles, and adapters, that require storage are used on top of an engine lift table. Here is a picture of a Cayenne engine and transmission sitting on the cradle that is perched on top of the lifting table. The adapter is the gold colored contraption. Porsche has multiple of these adapted including Panamera, Carrera GT, and Cayenne.

I had offered to weld up an A-frame style cart that would allow the larger cradles to hang. The idea would be to fabricate shelving for all the extra adapters. The only request on the dealerships part was that the cart was painted red. I basically was allowed to fabricate the cart any way I saw fit as long as it held all the necessary tooling.

So I lugged all the engine cradles and adapters home and started to measure and configure in order to come up with a plan. The engineering was far from complicated and the main focus was to make the entire unit as compact as possible.

It seems like it has been awhile since I have posted just some basic fabrication that I do in the shop. To some of you the pictures may be boring. For me I like seeing how others complete some of the most basic tasks and so this is what I have tried to show. It is cool how many different ways there are to go about accomplishing the same thing. The following shows you my way.

155 setting for circles

Setting up my plasma circle guide to do some radius cuts on 8″ mild steel. The radius gets set to 4 inches.

155 spittin sparks

I love watching sparks fly. Some people have a horsepower and torque addiction. For me it’s all about molten metal.

155 rough cur 8 inches

This is the top tray and support for the structure built from 8″ wide by 3/8″ thick mild steel. I wanted to give the tray come nice lines therefore curves are in order.

155 bending edges

The top tray support needs some sides in order to prevent stored hardware from getting away. The sides were bent from 2″ x .125″ flat bar.

155 clamped 4 welding

The flat bar sides were bent in two sections then clamped to the base and welded.

155 top tray

Here is the top tray support completed.

155 cut 2 length

With the top completed it was time to move onto the base. The stock was cut to size. The base was plasma cut out of 10 gauge and the perimeter is 2×4 steel tubing.

155 lower tray

Not a lot of fancy engineering going on here. The base is fairly basic. Just needed to be clamped in place and welded. The base measured 24″ x 60″.

155 caster spacing

I hate drilling for casters. It is boring and time consuming so I decided to make a jig to speed things up. I dialed in the caster bolt spacing into the milling machined DRO.

155 caster template

With the DRO programmed I drilled a template with my caster bolt spacing.

155 drilling 4 wheels

Now that I had a jig with perfect bolt hole spacing I was able to quickly drill all 4 corners of the base for fitting of the casters.

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Base complete. Nothing great to look at at but it’s functional.

155 clamping uprights

Time to connect the upper tray to the lower base. Lots of clamping and measuring before things got tack welded into place.

155 3D roughed

Here the upper and lower got final welded. Everything measured out square. The Germans would be proud of me.

155 test fit b4 continuing

Before going on I wanted to ensure the cradles would hang properly on the rack. Clearances worked out great.

155 pegs clear

The peg clearance wasn’t left to chance, I calculated it all out before welding on the hooks.

155 middle tray

Last tray to complete. I planned to put a middle tray in to allow for more storage. This one was built from 10 gauge and featured a similar design to the top tray.

155 middle tray test

Test fitting the middle tray before moving on. In this picture you can see the hooks I fabricated to allow for hanging of the engine cradles.

155 middle tray sides

Bending more sides for the middle tray.

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Clamped and TIG welded.

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Completed support. All it needs now is some color.

155 underbelly red

I gave the option of sending out the rack for powder coating or I could just Tremclad it as a cheap option. They opted for Tremclad so although the finish prevents the final product from looking completely pro it was not in the budget. They requested red for visibility so the Fire Engine red got brushed on.

155 Fire Engine red

155 trays

155 Finished cart

153 Title bike

The momentum has not slowed and the finish is in sight. Reassembly of the CB160 continues to go strong and steady. It has taken me many years to learn how much time I need to budget for project completion. In the case of the 65Revive project I had already planned out a reassembly timeline back in September. I am please to say that I am on track and may even be slightly ahead of schedule. I am looking forward to the riding season and want to ensure that the bike is 100% complete before the spring melt off.

I last left off with a rolling chassis and an engine bolted in. Since that time I have been able to reach approximately 98% completion. I have already started fearing potential empty nest syndrome. Like previously posts I’ll take you through the process with pictures.

153 Hardware never ends

The powder coating seems to never end. I am hoping this is the last bit of hardware I need to coat, here the the final parts have been blasted. My objective was to NOT use one spec of spray bomb on the bike, I am pleased to announce I have succeeded.

153 More baking

Last bit of baking, this round ran me out of hanging wire.

153 Lic bracket

As much as no one wants to run a license plate it is required. I set up some 6061 aluminum on the mill and machined out a nice simple holder. Once complete it was powder coated matte black to blend it in.

153 Seat fitment

The lines of the bike are very crucial therefore fit and finish are a priority. I spent awhile building adjustments into the seat in order to allow it to sit perfectly with the rear frame hoop.

153 Hiding wires

One of the main build objectives was to hide all the wiring. In the case of the handle bars the wiring all got run inside. Holes were drilled and grommets installed to keep things clean.

153 Rat's nest

The factory wire harness was of no use to me. Almost every electrical component on the bike had been upgraded or moved. The entire wiring harness was built from scratch. I initially drew out a rough plan on paper but in the end I ended up building it as I went along. Many of the connectors were upgraded to weather pack connectors. All splices were soldered and wrapped with heat shrink.

153 Cleaned up

I am a big believer that even components that are not seen need to be clean and have the same attention to detail. The custom wiring harness cleaned up well in the end and everything tucked in beautifully.

153 Packed in

Here you can see everything I packed into under the fuel tank. Horn, coil, and a couple of relays.

153 New chain

I don’t know why I am posting this picture. Look everyone! I put a new chain on! Whooooopppppppeeee!

153 Bike tuning

With most of the bike complete I spent some time tuning the carbs and checking the timing. I set it up near the garage door and ran an exhaust hose out so I wouldn’t choke out on the fumes.

153 Carb sync

Was able to sync the carbs beautifully.

153 Base timing

Base ignition timing came in at 12 degrees, good enough for me.

153 Full advance

Full advance? 42 degrees! Nothing like getting a jump on that power stroke.

Below is video proof the the bike is alive. It starts great and runs. The custom exhaust and muffler sound good.

153 Cover swap

With tuning done and ignition timing confirmed I was able to swap out my timing cover for the NOS Honda stator cover.

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From here on in it is basically a picture show. The bike is complete. There are a few details that need to be addressed but I need to wait until I can ride it before I can evaluate what needs to be done.

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I opted to mount a super clean button in my steering stem that allows me to cycle through my instrument cluster menus.

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Instead of using the factory starter button I chose to mount one next to the ignition switch. I turned the factory starter button, on the throttle housing, into my horn button. I like to think of it as my security system. If someone tries to start the bike they will end up sounding the horn instead of cranking the engine. Ha!

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I spent forever obsessing about the rear brake switch. I wanted something clean. I finally came up with the idea of using the rear brake lever stop as the switch. I Machined some plastic bushings in order to insulate the stop. Then using a single ground wire and a 5 pin relay I was able to turn the stop into a switch. Worked great and is almost undetectable.

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So the main work is complete and I need to turn my attention to getting this thing insured and registered. It is not that straight forward and I need to jump through hoops almost every step of the way. I have budgeted a month to deal with the paperwork and hope that things will work in my favor.

CB160 right side

152 Title piston

Every once and awhile I will cruise through my blog postings just to take stock of what I have posted in the past and therefore I am able to plan for the future. I am the sole editor of all my posts. I review the post before I publish it, I ensure all the links work, the pictures will blow up to full size, and the grammar and spelling are correct. The reason I am telling you this is because I can’t believe how many spelling mistakes I catch when reviewing my work once it has already been published. So in this posting I am offering up an apology in my obvious downfall as an editor. I will continue to try and improve however I suspect I will always miss a certain number of spelling and grammatical errors. I realize it probably does not bother most of you but it bugs me. There…I said it, let’s move on.

As my blog will show I have spent the majority of my garage time working on my 65revive project. There are still times when I fit in side projects and usually it is something that is functional and not worth posting. The other day I was in need of a thank you gift for a friend who helped me out with a few things so I thought I would build one. I wanted something cool but I wasn’t able to commit a weeks’ worth of time to the project. After some pondering I came up with an idea that allowed the task to be accomplished in an evening yet still have a bit of wow factor. The following pictures will run through the 4 hour build process of what turned out to be a thank you for much appreciated help.

152 BMW piston

Started out with an old BMW piston I had laying around.

152 Initial clean up

I performed an initial clean up on the lathe using 320 grit sandpaper and Scotchbite.

152 Starter hole

Next I moved onto the milling machine to center the piston out and drill a starter hole.

152 Milling slot

Next step was to mill out a slot large enough to hold a stack of business cards. I milled just far enough to allow the pin bosses to act as some internal card support.

152 Trimming base

I needed to build a base in order to seal the bottom off that way if the card holder is picked up the cards won’t fall out the bottom. I rough cut a circle out of .375″ plate 6061 aluminum using the plasma torch.

152 Machined to fit

With the disc rough cut I was able to machine it down to final dimensions on the lathe.I made it to be a press fit into the piston base.

152 Bottom blasted

With all the “construction” completed it was time to move onto the finsihing phase. Here the top of the piston got taped off and the bottom half was glass bead blasted.

152 Top polished

Now the bottom section gets taped and the top half gets a 3 stage polishing.

152 Powder coated

It was time to now fog the bottom with matte black powder coating and slide it into the oven for a 15 minute heat soak at 375 degrees.

152 Completed holder

Finished product. It’s not a work of art but it is functional and kind of cool.

151 Title speedo drive

I figured it was time to post some garage updates. Things have not slowed down and the garage continues to be just as active as it has always been. So busy that it is hard to put down the tools in order to update the blog. Well today is the day that I was able to upload a pile-o-pics to show what kind of work has been taking place on the 1965 Honda CB160 rebuild.

The last update showed that the bike finally got torn down and the fabricating continued to take place. Eventually it got to the point where I had to direct my attention to the bodywork and painting. Both things that I do not have a high level of confidence in performing. However I have no choice. My goal is to prove to myself that a decent bike can be built all within the confines of my 4 garage walls. So I trek on and tackle the aspects that require a certain amount of learning on my part.

I finally was able to paint all the components. I spent an entire weekend setting up my collapsible paint booth and spraying everything that required paint. It was a huge step that I completed and which also got me 1 step closer to the reassembly phase.

So I have posted the pictures and provided captions to help show what I have been up to over the past couple of months. Things continue to move along and progress is smooth. Enjoy the show.

151 Lower triple mod

The lower triple initially had the steering lock tumbler mount cast into it. My original plan was to keep the steering lock however the tumbler was to far gone to save therefore I opted to remove all evidence that it ever existed. I cut and ground the casting off on in the center of the triple. In order to mount my aftermarket steering stabilizer I needs to mill a flat surface on the triple for the stablizer bushing to mount flush on. My mill chuck was to big to get the job done so I used the drill press to clean up the surface.

151 Triple thread repair

The stabilizer mounting threads were stripped out so I ended up performing a thread repair. Years ago I got onto Time-Sert kits and have fallen in love with them. I will never go back to a Helicoil again.

151 Speedo drive adapter

In a previous posting I outlined how I was going to use a GPS based speedo signal. Part of the reason for doing so was to eliminate the front speedo drive cable. With no cable I no longer need the speedo drive which mounts onto the front axle. Since the drive also acts as a spacer I needed to machine a new spaacer to take its place. I could have made a fairly plain, yet functional, drive fairly quickly however I wanted to give the new component some good looks. I opted to machine a rounded, concave, cosmetic groove into it using my rotary table and my mill.

151 Finished initial cut

A pile of shredded aluminum was what I was left with once I was content with the groove depth.

151 Finishing speedo on lathe

The remainder of the adapter was finished up on the lathe.

151 Completed speedo adapter

On the left is the original speedo drive and on the right is the freshly machined spacer intended for taking the drives place. Still needs powder coating.

151 Throttle housing 5mm thread

Back in the sixties Honda built there bikes using a JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) thread pitch for all of their bolts. Some of the thread pitches were different then what eventually became an industry standard years later. The 5mm bolt is one of the threads that changed. Since I updated many of the fasteners on the bike I opted to update the thread pitches as well. I installed a couple of industry standard 5mm Time-Serts in the throttle housing so that I could now use readily available SS socket head bolts.

151 Frame blasted

So with much of the fabrication work completed it was time to shift my focus to paint. The frame mods had all been done and therefore it was time to start the paint prep work. As much as I like to keep all my work “in-house” I opted to send the frame out for blasting. The simple fact is that I could not fit the frame in my blast cabinet and I was not about to blast it outside as the mess is not worth it. The company that performed the blasting did a great job.

151 Fiberglass prep

Bodywork is not one of my strong points however it was not going to happen on its own so I just sucked it up and did it. Once I got into it the progress clipped along at a good pace. The aftermarket fiberglass components purchased from Glass From The Past were in good shape. There were some minor pinholes that required touch up using glazing putty.

151 Centering front fender

I had forgotten to trim the fender mounting holes prior to tearing the bike down. I was forced to temporarily rebuild the front end in order to trim the fender up to ensure it would be centered on the front wheel.

151 Prepped for paint

Here are all the components (minus the frame) that are going to recieve the paint. All ready to go into the paint booth.

151 Liquid supplies

I am shooting 2 colors. Some of the components will be getting sprayed with Hot Rod flat black and the tank and seat pan will get some color put on them.

151 Primer shot

With the primer coat applied I was able to confirm the fibergalss parts were in very good shape.

151 Fixing pinholes

I had missed a few pinholes on the seat pan during my initial prep. Since the pan is such a huge player in the look of the bike I opted to touch things up and respray the primer before it went in for the base coat.

151 Frame flat black

Here is the frame and front fender hanging in the paint booth with a fresh coat of flat black applied. No runs!

151 Retro brown

The retro brown color was mixed up and the tank and seat pan were about to come alive.

151 Brown seat

The brown sprayed on great. Each component got three coats of top coat. The plan is not to apply a clear coat as the vintage/retro look is what I am going for.

151 Brown tank

The lighting in the paint booth is great for painting but not so good for photography. At least you can see the results of the sprayed tank.

151 Brown cowl

I am very happy with the seat cowl, it looks like glass.

151 Painted matte black

After a weekend of work I was able to get all my components painted. Here are all the flat black components. I will post more on the colored parts later.

151 Powder coat pile

With the painting complete I still had to make a few more powder coating runs. Here is yet another pile of components getting coated.

151 Swing arm getting powder

I opted to powder coat the swing arm instead of painting it. Powder coating is so much more durable. I was intially concerned that my flat black powder coat may be a slightly different shade then the Hot Rod flat black sprayed onto the frame. It turns out the colors are incredibly close to the point were you can’t see a difference.

151 Powder coating hardware

Some parts fogged with powder prior to baking.

151 Powder coated pile

Here is one pile of completed poweder coated parts.

151 New balls

With 90% of the refinishing complete there was nothing left to do but reassemble. The steering head recieved all new, OEM Honda, inner/outer races and ball bearings.

151 New rear sprocket

The rear wheel recieved a new 38 tooth aluminum sprocket from Sprocket Specialists.

151 Swing arm install

Swing arm installed.

151 Rear sets installed

Rear sets installed.

151 Rear detail

Rear wheel and rear suspension in.

151 Rear end supported

Finally got the bike to stand on one leg.

151 Ready for an engine

Front end is installed and now the bike waits for the engine (sitting on the bench). I had previously fabricated a different kick stand which bolts to the lower engine case therefore the bike won’t have a “third leg” until the engine is in.

151 Taking shape

With the help of a couple of friends we were able to slide the engine in place creating no damage in the process.

151 Engine installed

So here it is, progress keeps going. I continue to go full steam ahead. I will try and not wait so long to get the next installment of the 65Revive project posted. Stay tuned.